Jiddu Krishnamurti Ponders His Enlightenment & Kundalini Awakening

Jiddu Krishnamurti and Kundalini

From:             Krishnamurti’s Notebook
Author:           Jiddu Krishnamurti
Chapter:         Gstaad  23rd: Page 33
Published By:   Krishnamurti Publications of America

In continuing to try to bring you some of the more uncommon teachings of Jiddu Krishnamurti – one of the more remarkable spiritual teacher’s of our modern era – I thought the following would be of interest to those passionate about enlightenment and Kundalini Awakening.  The following are a list of “prerequisites” that Krishnamurti came up with when trying to determine why he had been blessed with his Kundalini Awakening and enlightenment experiences.  He, of course, calls what he underwent “the process”, but from the perspective of Yoga, “the process” would be called a Kundalini Awakening.  You can get more information on Jiddu Krishnamurti and his teachings at the Krishnamurti Foundation of America Website.

Here are Krishnamurti’s thoughts for perhaps why this took place in him in his own words…

“Why should all this happen to us?  No explanation is good enough, though one can invent a dozen.  But certain things are fairly clear.

  1. One must be wholly “indifferent” to its coming and going.
  2. There must be no desire to continue the experience or store it away in memory.
  3. There must be a certain physical sensitivity, a certain indifference to comfort.
  4. There must be a self-critical humorous approach.
  5. You can also add love to this list but it is beyond love.
  6. And you can add also a still, quiet brain.”

(5 and 6 he adds later in the page)

Krishnamurti also says, “It must come and you can never go after it.  Do what you will.”  So there you have it.  His take on what he believes might have led to his enlightenment and Kundalini Awakening.  To me this list can somewhat be summed up by the following 2 phrases.  First, is what I call the first law of Tantra, “Whatever comes let it come, whatever goes let it go.”  Which correlates to items 1, 2, 3 and 4 in Krishnamurti’s list above.  Second, is the phrase, “All you can do is prepare the garden, the flower must bloom on its own.”  Which correlates to items 5 and 6 of his list.  If you can live by these 2 rules, remarkable dimensions will open up for you.

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  1. Dr.Subhassh
    Dr.Subhassh says:

    It is good to seeVipassana meditation(By SN Goenka) mentioned here.As I went into this site, my one thought was to mention Vipassana meditation(the 10 day course).and I already see it here.Its origine is from Burma.The teaching was kept in its original form in Burma,as it was practiced by BUDDHA to attain Enlightenment.Goenkje, a rich businessman,who had severe migraine was looking for treatment all over the world with no help.The doctor in Japan told him to go back to Burma for treatment,as Japan had no medication for him.And the history goes on.With great relectance,he joined the course(10 days).Actually he wanted to runaway the 2nd day,but a lady Prof.convenienced him to stay for one more day.And that went on to 14 years.That year he went to India to teach his sick mother and a few family members.From there it spread to all over the world.It was predicted that after 2005 years after passing of THE BUDDHA,Buddism will go back to India,and it is that year that SN.Goenkaji went to India with Vipassana Meditation,which was originally taught by THE BUDDHA.I love an answer he gave in one of his talks,when asked by a person “if doing Vipassana Meditation will it change him from his present religion”.The answer he gave is”Yes it will change you,but not from one religion to another,but from suffering to Enlightenment”,and you must see the tundering applause from the audiance.It is good to look into this Vipassan Meditation.Go into:www.dhamma.org

    Dr.Subhassh (Malaysia)

    Reply
  2. Solomon
    Solomon says:

    The cultivation of intuition through meditation will lead to full understanding of the kundalini process without the need for doubt, question, or message board. So long as the devotee be a devotee.

    Reply
  3. Tejas
    Tejas says:

    Anmol, It is revealing that JK left out the major pre-requisite for the ‘process’ – initiation. In public, he always avoided mentioning initiation and masters.

    BTW I dont think UGK ever used kundalini to explain his calamity.

    Reply
  4. Anmol Mehta
    Anmol Mehta says:

    Hi Tejas,

    UG makes for interesting reading and I am sure his presence and company would help directly, but other than that, reading UG is not very helpful.

    The best thing he has said, I feel, is along the lines that we never consider that the real problem is actually chasing enlightenment itself.

    Krishnamurti on the other hard, is very useful to read and re-read. That itself will change you and let’s not forget that UG’s calamity happened right when listening to a JK talk.

    Both certainly went through a profound Kundalini awakening.

    Best,
    Anmol

    Reply
  5. Tejas
    Tejas says:

    Bhai, what do you make of UG Krishnamurti’s ‘calamity’. To me it sounds similiar to JK’s ‘process’ in that both were accompanied by severe physical pain and took a long time to stabilize. UG sure has some great insights into the human condition, but can be cranky as hell at the same time. It’s as if he does not want to be bound by roles. Whats ur opinion?

    Reply
  6. Lillibelle
    Lillibelle says:

    I’ve also had my own personal experiences with a psychedelic and without. Last year, I tried a strain of psilocybe mushroom that gave me this vast spiritual experience that I didn’t expect. I could only call it ego-death. I was feeling such love and nurturing, like I was interconnected with everything and the Universe was waiting outside my window and I was it along with it. It was lovely blissful, and in that love and feeling that I was nurtured, nurturing, and nurturance itself, loved, loving, and love itself, I leaned back, closed my eyes, and I was gone. It was like nowhere but everywhere, nothing but everything. This interconnected honeycomb existence where the core of you still existed but there was no conflict, no opinion, no doubt, fear, pain, or worry, no desire. It was blissful. It felt like I was there for ages. And when I opened my eyes again, I was amazed it had only been a couple minutes. After that, I read a bit about the different forms of Buddhism and found correlations. Later still, the end of 2009, the man I loved more than anything else, died. And I became very spiritual-minded. I’ve been meditating everyday. And I’ve been getting the energy flushes and the feeling of slowing becoming detached from everything. I’ve been having trouble sleeping. I’ve been extremely unafraid of death and tho I don’t take actions towards it, I’m kind of looking forward to it and want it. I can feel pressure in my brow (third eye area at random times.) During meditations I’ve heard things and felt my body move when it hadn’t physically moved, etc. And I’ve felt very cold energy settle and travel over the left side of my body and the upper arm on the right side. But not the right side of my body, which sometimes aches for no reason. Just wanted to share all that. :)

    Reply
  7. Colin
    Colin says:

    This is a very interesting post, thanks Anmol!

    I don’t think drugs of any sort are necessary to achieve heightened states of awareness or an experience of non-ordinary reality. Some here have said that is requires a lot of desciplined meditation, and that is true. But what has helped me greatly along this path S.N. Goenka’s is Vipassana meditation ( http://www.dhamma.org ). The 10-day courses are very focused and will certainly bring deepened awareness, because the environment is correct for serious meditation. If you want to make progress without using shortcuts such as drugs, doing a 10-day course is a good start! For me, it helped me to get truly established in meditation… before Vipassana, I had done weekend stuff, or messed around with meditation books, but little progress is made.

    One of the things I really liked about Vipassana is that it is – to many of it’s practitioners – a practical J.Krishnamurti. Pretty much everything that is spoken in the discourses during the course is in line with what Krishnamurti has spoken of.

    Reply

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